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Download Driftin Herbie Hancock PDF 11 and Enjoy This Swingin' Tune


Driftin Herbie Hancock PDF 11: A Jazz Masterpiece




If you are a fan of jazz music, you have probably heard of Herbie Hancock, one of the most influential and innovative jazz pianists and composers of all time. But do you know his song Driftin, which he recorded when he was only 23 years old? In this article, we will explore the background, the analysis, and the performance of Driftin Herbie Hancock PDF 11, a jazz masterpiece that showcases Hancock's talent and creativity.




driftin herbie hancock pdf 11



Introduction




Who is Herbie Hancock?




Herbie Hancock was born in Chicago in 1940. He started playing piano at the age of seven and was a child prodigy who performed a Mozart concerto with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra at the age of 11. He was also interested in jazz and learned from listening to records by Oscar Peterson, George Shearing, and Bill Evans. He attended Grinnell College and majored in electrical engineering, but he also studied music and played in local jazz clubs. In 1960, he moved to New York and joined Donald Byrd's quintet, where he gained recognition as a pianist and composer. In 1962, he signed with Blue Note Records and released his debut album Takin' Off, which included his first hit Watermelon Man.


What is Driftin?




Driftin is the first track on Hancock's second album My Point of View, which was released in 1963. It is a blues-based composition that features a simple but catchy melody and a relaxed groove. The song is in the key of F major and has a 12-bar blues form with some variations. The title Driftin suggests a sense of wandering and freedom, which is reflected in the mood and style of the song.


Why is Driftin important in jazz history?




Driftin is important in jazz history for several reasons. First, it showcases Hancock's ability to write original and memorable tunes that blend traditional and modern elements. Second, it demonstrates Hancock's skill as a pianist who can play with clarity, elegance, and swing. Third, it features a stellar lineup of musicians who would later become legends in their own right: Freddie Hubbard on trumpet, Hank Mobley on tenor saxophone, Grant Green on guitar, Chuck Israels on bass, and Tony Williams on drums. Fourth, it represents Hancock's early contribution to the hard bop genre, which was a style of jazz that emerged in the 1950s and 1960s that combined bebop's complexity and intensity with blues and gospel influences.


Analysis of Driftin Herbie Hancock PDF 11




The structure of the song




The melody




The melody of Driftin is based on the blues scale, which is a six-note scale that consists of the root, minor third, fourth, fifth, flat seventh, and octave. The melody uses mostly quarter notes and eighth notes, creating a smooth and flowing line. The melody also uses some chromatic notes (notes that are not in the scale) to add color and tension. For example, in the first four bars, the melody uses an E natural (the major seventh) and a B natural (the sharp fourth) to create contrast with the F major chord. The melody also uses some syncopation (accenting off-beats) to create rhythmic interest and swing. For example, in the fifth and sixth bars, the melody starts on the second half of the first beat, creating a slight delay and anticipation.


The harmony




The harmony of Driftin is based on the 12-bar blues form, which is a common chord progression in jazz and other genres. The 12-bar blues form consists of three four-bar phrases, each with a different chord sequence. The basic 12-bar blues form in F major is: F7 F7 F7 F7 --- --- --- --- Bb7 Bb7 F7 F7 C7 Bb7 F7 C7 However, Hancock adds some variations and substitutions to make the harmony more interesting and sophisticated. For example, in the first four bars, he replaces the F7 chord with a Dm7 chord in the second bar and a Gm7 chord in the fourth bar, creating a ii-V-I progression that leads back to the F7 chord. In the second four bars, he replaces the Bb7 chord with a Db9 chord in the sixth bar, creating a tritone substitution that adds chromaticism and tension. In the last four bars, he replaces the C7 chord with an Ab13 chord in the tenth bar, creating another tritone substitution that leads to the Bb7 chord. He also adds a Dm7-G7-Cm7-F7 turnaround in the last two bars, creating a cycle of fifths that leads back to the beginning of the form.


The rhythm




The rhythm of Driftin is based on a swing feel, which is a characteristic feature of jazz music. Swing feel is a way of playing eighth notes that are not equal in duration, but rather have a long-short pattern that creates a sense of groove and bounce. Swing feel can also be applied to other rhythmic values, such as quarter notes and sixteenth notes. The rhythm section (bass and drums) plays a steady swing feel throughout the song, providing a solid foundation for the melody and solos. The bass plays a walking bass line, which is a way of playing four notes per bar that outline the harmony and connect smoothly from one chord to another. The drums play a swing pattern, which is a way of playing the hi-hat on every second and fourth beat, the snare drum on every second and fourth beat, and the bass drum on every first and third beat.


The performance of the song




The instruments




The instruments used in Driftin are typical of a hard bop ensemble: trumpet, tenor saxophone, guitar, piano, bass, and drums. Each instrument has a distinct role and sound in the song. The trumpet and tenor saxophone play the melody in unison at the beginning and end of the song, creating a bright and powerful sound. They also play solos in between, showcasing their individual styles and expressions. The guitar plays chords behind the melody and solos, adding texture and harmony. The piano plays chords and fills behind the melody and solos, adding color and variety. The bass plays a walking bass line throughout the song, adding rhythm and harmony. The drums play a swing pattern throughout the song, adding groove and drive.


The improvisation




The improvisation is an essential part of jazz music, where musicians create new melodies on the spot based on the structure and harmony of the song. In Driftin, each soloist (trumpet, tenor saxophone, guitar, piano) takes one or more choruses (one complete cycle of the 12-bar blues form) to improvise over the chord changes. Each soloist uses different techniques and strategies to create interesting and coherent solos. For example, some of the techniques and strategies are: - Using scales and modes that fit the chords (such as F blues scale, F mixolydian mode, Db lydian dominant mode) - Using arpeggios (broken chords) that outline the chords (such as Dm7 arpeggio, Gm7 arpeggio) - Using motifs (short musical ideas) that are repeated or developed (such as Hancock's four-note motif in his solo) - Using chromaticism (notes that are not in the scale) that create tension and resolution (such as Hubbard's use of E natural over F major) - Using rhythmic variation (changing the duration or placement of notes) that create interest and swing (such as Mobley's use of syncopation in his solo) The interaction




The interaction is another important part of jazz music, where musicians communicate and respond to each other through their instruments. In Driftin, the interaction is evident in several ways. For example, some of the ways are: - Using call and response (one musician plays a phrase and another musician answers with a similar or contrasting phrase) (such as Hancock and Green's exchange in the introduction) - Using trading (two or more musicians take turns playing short phrases) (such as Hubbard and Mobley's trading in the last chorus) - Using comping (playing chords or rhythmic patterns behind a soloist) (such as Green and Hancock's comping behind Hubbard and Mobley) - Using fills (playing short phrases between the melody or solo) (such as Williams' drum fills throughout the song) - Using cues (signaling the start or end of a section or solo) (such as Hancock's piano cue at the end of his solo)


Conclusion




Summary of the main points




In conclusion, Driftin Herbie Hancock PDF 11 is a jazz masterpiece that showcases Hancock's talent and creativity as a composer, pianist, and bandleader. It is a blues-based composition that features a simple but catchy melody, a relaxed groove, and a sophisticated harmony. It also features a stellar lineup of musicians who deliver outstanding performances, improvisations, and interactions. It is a song that represents Hancock's early contribution to the hard bop genre, which was a style of jazz that combined bebop's complexity and intensity with blues and gospel influences.


Recommendations for further listening




If you enjoyed Driftin Herbie Hancock PDF 11, you might also like to listen to some of his other songs from his early career, such as: - Watermelon Man (from Takin' Off, 1962) - Maiden Voyage (from Maiden Voyage, 1965) - Cantaloupe Island (from Empyrean Isles, 1964) - Dolphin Dance (from Maiden Voyage, 1965) - One Finger Snap (from Empyrean Isles, 1964) You might also like to listen to some of the other songs from My Point of View, such as: - Blind Man, Blind Man - A Tribute to Someone - King Cobra - The Pleasure Is Mine - And What If I Don't


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about Driftin Herbie Hancock PDF 11:



  • What does PDF 11 mean?



PDF 11 is a file format that contains the sheet music for Driftin. It is a digital version of the original handwritten score that Hancock wrote for his band. You can download it from various online sources if you want to play or study the song.


  • What is the tempo of Driftin?



The tempo of Driftin is about 120 beats per minute (bpm), which is a moderate speed that creates a relaxed and swinging feel. The tempo can vary slightly depending on the performance or recording.


  • What is the key signature of Driftin?



The key signature of Driftin is one flat (Bb), which indicates that the song is in the key of F major. However, the song also uses some chords and notes that are not in the key of F major, such as Db9 and Ab13, which create chromaticism and tension.


  • Who played guitar on Driftin?



The guitarist who played on Driftin was Grant Green, who was one of the most prominent and influential jazz guitarists of his time. He was known for his clear tone, melodic style, and bluesy feel. He played on many Blue Note albums with various artists, such as Horace Silver, Jimmy Smith, Lee Morgan, and Sonny Clark.


  • Where can I listen to Driftin?



You can listen to Driftin on various platforms, such as YouTube, Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Music, Deezer, Tidal, etc. You can also buy or stream the album My Point of View from various online sources.


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