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Westlife - No Place That Far (Official Audio) WORK


Your ability to create a mix that translates to other sound systems depends on more than the tools and equipment you use. The structure of your studio, where you place your speakers, and even where you sit, affect what you hear. Changing the construction of your room is not possible, and even expensive acoustic paneling and treatment may not address every issue.




Westlife - No Place That Far (Official Audio)



In contrast, an alternative literature based on actual history concludes that the civil society of the American West in the nineteenth century was not very violent. Eugene Hollon writes that the western frontier “was a far more civilized, more peaceful and safer place than American society today” (1974, x). Terry Anderson and P. J. Hill affirm that although “[t]he West . . . is perceived as a place of great chaos, with little respect for property or life,” their research “indicates that this was not the case; property rights were protected and civil order prevailed. Private agencies provided the necessary basis for an orderly society in which property was protected and conflicts were resolved” (1979, 10).


In sum, this work by Benson, Anderson and Hill, Umbeck, and others challenges with solid historical research the claims made by the “West was violent” authors. The civil society of the American West in the nineteenth century was much more peaceful than American cities are today, and the evidence suggests that in fact the Old West was not a very violent place at all. History also reveals that the expanded presence of the U.S. government was the real cause of a culture of violence in the American West. If there is anything to the idea that a nineteenth-century culture of violence on the American frontier is the genesis of much of the violence in the United States today, the main source of that culture is therefore government, not civil society.


The change from militia to a standing army took place in the American West immediately upon the conclusion of the War Between the States. The result, say Anderson and McChesney, was that white settlers and railroad corporations were able to socialize the costs of stealing Indian lands by using violence supplied by the U.S. Army. On their own, they were much more likely to negotiate peacefully. Thus, “raid” replaced “trade” in white–Indian relations. Congress even voted in 1871 not to ratify any more Indian treaties, effectively announcing that it no longer sought peaceful relations with the Plains Indians.


The escalation of violence against the Plains Indians actually began in earnest during the War Between the States. Sherman and Sheridan’s Indian policy was a continuation and escalation of a policy that General Grenville Dodge, among others, had already commenced. In 1851, the Santee Sioux Indians in Minnesota sold 24 million acres of land to the U.S. government for $1,410,000 in a typical “trade” (as opposed to raid) scenario. The federal government once again did not keep its side of the bargain, though, reneging on its payment to the Indians (Nichols 1978). By 1862, thousands of white settlers were moving onto the Indians’ land, and a crop failure in that year caused the Santee Sioux to become desperate for food. They attempted to take back their land by force with a short “war” in which President Lincoln placed General John Pope in charge. Pope announced, “It is my purpose to utterly exterminate the Sioux. . . . They are to be treated as maniacs or wild beasts, and by no means as people with whom treaties or compromises can be made” (qtd. in Nichols 1978, 87).


One of the most famous incidents of Indian extermination, known as the Sand Creek Massacre, took place on November 29, 1864. There was a Cheyenne and Arapaho village located on Sand Creek in southeastern Colorado. These Indians had been assured by the U.S. government that they would be safe in Colorado. The government instructed them to fly a U.S. flag over their village, which they did, to assure their safety. However, another Civil War “luminary,” Colonel John Chivington, had other plans for them as he raided the village with 750 heavily armed soldiers. One account of what happened appears in the book Crimsoned Prairie: The Indian Wars (1972) by the renowned military historian S. L. A. Marshall, who held the title of chief historian of the European Theater in World War II and authored thirty books on American military history.


If I had to run, if I had to crawlSi je devais courir, si je devais ramperIf I had to swim a hundred rivers, just to climb a thousand walls,Si je devais traverser cent rivières, escalader mille mursAlways know that I will find a way, to get to where you are,Toujours su que je trouverais un moyen, d'arriver où tu esThere's no place that farIl n'y a pas d'endroit assez loin


If I had to run, if I had to crawlSi je devais courir, si je devais ramperIf I had to swim a hundred rivers, just to climb a thousand walls,Si je devais traverser cent rivières, escalader mille mursAlways know that I will find a way, to get to where you are,Toujours su que je trouverais un moyen, d'arriver ou tu esThere's no place that farIl n'y a pas d'endroit assez loin


Oh I don't know like I would want to go places like, like cultural places if I was going to travel like, like places like, like places in Asia and stuff 'cause I haven't been there, like Africa and stuff like but, obv- obviously I want to go to like holiday holidays as well like hot places but like if I -- if I was actually travelling then I would go like places like that like Africa and that 041b061a72


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